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Lex Friedman fighting the good fight:

Many free apps are fine. But when you pay for a premium app, you are often paying for a deeper, more well-considered experience—one in which you are truly the customer, and not the advertisers supporting the “free” app behind the scenes.

And, a bit later:

You don’t buy a Kindle just to enjoy the dictionary and manual that come pre-installed on the device. You shouldn’t buy an iPhone to enjoy only free apps, either. You’re cheating yourself, all because we’ve become conditioned to feeling that $5 is a lot to spend on an app. It’s okay to pay for good products.

My favorite thing to hear is people complaining about the poor quality or lack of features in apps, but refusing to pay for another app that is better in every way because “that one costs a dollar!” Idiots.

The worst part about this is that the quality of apps can’t and won’t improve if developers aren’t properly compensated for their time. This worries me the most, that despite my emphasis on paying, in the end it won’t matter because I’m one of the few paying and it won’t be enough to support excellent ad-free apps.

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Article Details

Published
by Ben Brooks
1 minute to read.


tl;dr

Lex Friedman fighting the good fight: Many free apps are fine. But when you pay for a premium app, you are often paying for a deeper, more well-considered experience—one in which you are truly the customer, and not the advertisers supporting the “free” app behind the scenes. And, a bit later: You don’t buy a […]