‘You’d be better off cleaning your gutters’

Farhad Manjoo writing for Slate about the useless practice of following breaking news, has this point about what happens if you just catch up with one in-depth article the following day:

And that’s it: You’ve now caught up with all your friends who spent the past day and a half going out of their minds following cable and Twitter. In fact, you’re now better informed than they are, because during your self-imposed exile from the news, you didn’t stumble into the many cul-de-sacs and dark alleys of misinformation that consumed their lives. You’re less frazzled, better rested, and your rain gutters are clear.

There’s a growing sentiment that I am starting to see among news junkies that perhaps it is time to pull back. To not following the news so closely. Instead, follow well-sourced, well-reported news — investigative journalism.

I’m horrible at not following breaking news, but I managed to be too busy with my own life to follow the events in Boston and Texas — instead I just caught up today with all of the stories. I don’t feel like I missed anything, I knew what was happening in a general sense while it was happening, and now I know what really did happen (including the screw ups) — and no one around me even had time to laugh at me for not being “informed”.

I highly recommend it.

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Article Details

Published
by Ben Brooks
1 minute to read.


tl;dr

Farhad Manjoo writing for Slate about the useless practice of following breaking news, has this point about what happens if you just catch up with one in-depth article the following day: And that’s it: You’ve now caught up with all your friends who spent the past day and a half going out of their minds […]