‘Prosecuting Snowden’

Bruce Schneier on the route to prosecuting Edward Snowden:

We need to determine whether these National Security Agency programs are themselves legal. The administration has successfully barred anyone from bringing a lawsuit challenging these laws, on the grounds of national secrecy. Now that we know those arguments are without merit, it’s time for those court challenges.

The New Yorker’s Amy Davidson, while responding to David Brooks, makes a solid point about Snowden too:

The founders did create the Constitution so that a solitary voice could be heard, whatever strictures of power surround it. More than that, they would not want a twenty-nine-year-old to feel so overcome with gratitude for his social betters—so humbled that they had noticed him—that he would be silent.

How, and what next steps, the Department of Justice takes towards Snowden is going to have a lasting impact for decades. I fear the NSA will walk away without being investigated and that Snowden will bear an unjust amount of punishment.

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Article Details

Published
by Ben Brooks
1 minute to read.


tl;dr

Bruce Schneier on the route to prosecuting Edward Snowden: We need to determine whether these National Security Agency programs are themselves legal. The administration has successfully barred anyone from bringing a lawsuit challenging these laws, on the grounds of national secrecy. Now that we know those arguments are without merit, it’s time for those court […]