• ‘The Slow Decay of the Microsoft Consumer’

    MG Siegler: To me right now, Microsoft’s consumer business feels like Nokia’s smartphone business a few years ago: the numbers look fine, and in some cases even good, but the world is quickly changing. Good comparison.

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  • TSA pats down 4-year-old after she hugs grandmother

    Rebecca Ruiz: Brademeyer said that a TSO began yelling at her daughter, would not permit her to pass through the scanner again and said that a pat-down was necessary. Isabel, according to her mother, was wearing Mary Jane shoes, a short-sleeve shirt and leggings that did not have pockets. “It was implied, several times, that […]

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  • What You Are Worth to Facebook

    Josh Constine: So if Facebook maintains its current revenue rate, it would make between $4.69 and $4.81 on each of its 901 million users each year. Impressive.

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  • The Nest

    I bought the Nest, despite knowing that it may completely suck and I waited excitedly for it to arrive knowing that I may be setting myself up for the biggest let down I have ever faced ((Not a joke.)) . I actually have quite a bit of knowledge about thermostats (unfortunately) since my day job […]

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  • Asteroid Mining Venture

    Mike Wall: A newly unveiled company with some high-profile backers — including filmmaker James Cameron and Google co-founder Larry Page — is set to announce plans to mine near-Earth asteroids for resources such as precious metals and water. Wonder where they got that idea…

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  • Google Drive

    John Gruber on the long rumored, just announced, Google Drive: Sure, I trust Google to index the contents of all my files. Why not? Yep. ((This also marks where I stop reading anything about the service and thus don’t follow news about it.))

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  • Ugly Keyboards

    Shawn Blanc looking at (some of) the ugliest keyboards that money can buy: If you too want to adorn your desk with an ugly keyboard — one with a loud personality and which increases typing productivity — then I recommend the Das Keyboard. It’s interesting to me that Shawn types faster on the mechanical keyboards […]

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  • Quote of the Day: Federico Viticci

    “Software can do anything, but sometimes it is the combination of hardware and software that yields new, unexpected results that take advantage of the interplay of bits and guts.” — Federico Viticci

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  • Softwar: An Intimate Portrait of Larry Ellison and Oracle

    A while back I had some stock in Oracle, I was amazed by Oracle and specifically by Ellison — it’s CEO and co-founder. When this biography (authorized) came out I immediately read it — it’s one of the few books I chose to read while still in college. It is a fascinating look at Ellison. […]

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  • ‘I Didn’t Realize Android Was *This* Open’

    MG Siegler responding to some ‘new’ information being brought to light in the Oracle v. Google spat: Maybe someone should copy Google’s search algorithms and open source them. Google probably has some IP there, but, you know, whatevs.

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  • ‘Static Images’

    Alex Knight this April (2012) talking about Wired magazine on the iPad: After subscribing, I downloaded the gargantuan April issue at 789MB. The good news is it took less than five minutes to download over LTE (there goes my data cap). The bad news is the user experience is absolutely horrible. Shawn Blanc on Wired […]

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  • Revenue Split Model and the DOJ

    John Gruber talking about the 30% cut Apple takes from every app/publisher: This is one of my biggest questions about the DOJ’s suit against Apple. Why are books any different than music or apps or periodicals? (And, if Apple loses this suit, does it mean their App Store and Music Store 70/30 pricing models are […]

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  • ‘Beleaguered Microsoft’

    The Macalope on Windows 8 tablets: The problem for Microsoft is that the “slap full applications on a touchscreen and call it a day” experience has been available for ten years, and only diehards like Brookwood have bought into it. If the Macalope were a betting beast, he’d wager Brookwood that the most successful Windows […]

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  • ‘If You Have a Smart Phone, Anyone Can Now Track Your Every Move’

    I don’t particularly like that this is possible, but that doesn’t change the fact that this technology is: Pretty cool. Potentially helpful if used in the right circumstances.

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  • Dropbox Link Sharing

    You can now share just a link to your Dropbox files for others to view and download. Nice.

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  • Quote of the Day: Matt Buchanan

    “The only reason to use the word ‘pivot,’ in its new Valley context, is to hide something with language — largely, to avoid talking about failure. Your app didn’t fail, you pivoted. Sorry, you failed.” — Matt Buchanan

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  • Migrate iWeb Blog to WordPress

    Nice script for those that need to migrate before MobileMe dies. (Note I don’t have an iWeb site to test this with.)

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  • [SPONSOR] Minigroup

    An Atlanta design firm uses Minigroup to work smarter and keep its clients happy Braizen uses Minigroup to manage projects and collaborate and communicate with their clients. A minigroup is a private, secure online space where members communicate with posts and comments, share large files, and manage projects. Braizen uses one minigroup like an intranet, […]

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  • New Nirvana

    Dave Winer responding to the Denton piece: Draw a Venn Diagram with two circles on it. On one circle write “articles” and on the other write “comments”. The size of each and how much they overlap tells you everything you need to know about an online publication. If one were to manage to make them […]

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  • Nick Denton, Gawker, On Comments

    Mathew Ingram reporting on coming changes to the way that Gawker handles comments, has this little nugget: This was actually the original vision behind Gawker: Denton said he noticed the discussion and gossip around a story in the newsroom or at the bar when he worked at the Financial Times was often far more interesting […]

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